HOW YOU MOVE IN THE GYM = HOW YOU MOVE IN LIFE

HOW YOU MOVE IN THE GYM = HOW YOU MOVE IN LIFE

Online Fitness Training & Movement Rehab by a Qualified Physiotherapist & Personal Trainer.

PLANTAR FASCIA TENSION RELEASE - BRINGING RELIEF TO THE SUPERFICIAL BACK LINE

PLANTAR FASCIA TENSION RELEASE - BRINGING RELIEF TO THE SUPERFICIAL BACK LINE

Plantarfascia release exercise for bottom of feet. Also helpful to release tension in calves & hamstrings.

INFLAMMATION STARTS IN THE GUT - ADDRESS YOUR DIET

This article shares some great points regarding foods that are pro-inflammatory and some alternative substitutes.  

I would highly recommend looking at your diet if you suffer from inflammatory conditions such as arthritis; any allergies; crohn's disease; eczema; fibromyalgia; psoriasis...and the list goes on.  
The vast majority of inflammatory conditions begin in the gut.  

Of course, it doesn't stop with just working on diet. You have to also take into account stress levels; movement levels; emotional state & hydration as some additional factors to assess and address. The body is a system, you can't treat the symptom without treating the cause and your body won't heal unless given the right environment to do so.

THE BENEFITS OF OVERHEAD PRESSING AFTER ROTATOR CUFF INJURY

THE BENEFITS OF OVERHEAD PRESSING AFTER ROTATOR CUFF INJURY

Shoulder injuries that lead to pain with overhead movements need to be corrected and then correct overhead biomechanics need to be engrained in order to remain pain free and build shoulder strength.

YOUR CHILD'S IPAD POSTURE

YOUR CHILD'S IPAD POSTURE

Examples of good and bad postures for kids on Ipads.

THE FUNDAMENTAL FLAWS OF CROSSFIT

crossfit flaws rehab trainer Adelaide and Gold Coast.jpg

Dr Stuart McGill, an expert on spinal health, brought up some valid points in this article - https://www.t-nation.com/training/doctors-view-of-crossfit

Here is my opinion:

I had previously been involved in crossfit for about 4 years, mostly training myself and competing in local comps, I joined a box (cross fit gym) for 6 months and then stopped crossfit altogether. This was long before there was a box on every corner and the words “wod”, “snatch” and “kipping” were so commonly known. I’ve seen a lot of different boxes and coaches and experienced them first hand as well as from a distance. I’ve also watched many a crossfitter compete and train and the same pet hates rear their ugly heads each time.

I will keep this short, sweet & to the point…here is a list of my issues with crossfit:

  • Most boxes don’t assess an individual's movement capacity prior to throwing them in a class nor do they take a record of their previous injuries…therefore leaving them open to risk of injury! It is the coaches responsibility to ensure each individual is training to THEIR individual capacity and to keep them safe from harm.

  • Scaleable does not = safe…one size does not fit all, just because you scale a movement for someone does not mean that the particular movement or the combination of movements in a particular workout aren't harmful for that individual.

  • The programming is just as advertised, “random” - often unqualified level 1 cross fit coaches are programming wods and bunching together random movements that as a workout can place excessive load on certain structures which can lead to injury or cause repetitive strain.

  • Not having at the very least a basic Cert III Fitness Training qualification as a coach (Cert III is even far from enough in my opinion).

  • Not having a clue about the human body; motor control or biomechanics and being a coach…as a result not knowing HOW to correct someone’s form in a way that works for THEM or not having the ability to assess someone's movement capacity before they even start crossfit.

  • Repeating the same movement (i.e. olympic lifts; chin ups; ghd sit-ups) within an extremely high rep range (50-100 reps) is only asking for fatigue and injury to come onboard. If endurance is what you want…pick your movements carefully!

  • Don’t believe or think peeing yourself is ok during a workout…this should NOT be happening!

  • Teaching someone how to snatch/clean & press in 10mins....followed by allowing that someone to load a snatch/clean & press the next time they're in the gym and/or encouraging them to find their 1RM is irresponsible.

  • Doing complex movements at heavy weights for large amounts of reps is not good for anyones motor control or spinal health. Fatigue will set in quick and this is when injury occurs or faulty movement patterns are engrained.

  • Cheering on someone to finish a workout with horrendous form when the better thing to do is get them to stop or rest enough for their muscles to actually be able to perform the task well.

  • Cheering on someone who has just completed a 1RM of any movement with compromising form (I've seen some shockers!).

  • Focussing on the numbers (how much you can lift) over the technique.

  • Advancing people onto kipping pullups before they can actually achieve a single decent strict bodyweight pullup unassisted (it should ideally be about 5 reps strict before attempting kipping), I would argue that chin-ups are more of a complex movement and used for strength rather than endurance so should be kept as a low rep strength movement and therefore ALWAYS be strict!

  • Thinking it's cool and hardcore to push through injury or physical damage i.e. ripped hands/chunks out of shins. These things ALL affect motor control!

  • Cost of crossfit memberships are extortionate considering the quality of coaching in most boxes - cost should reflect the quality of the service…a lot of boxes have one trainer (who usually just walks around shouting “good job”; “push guys”; “you got this” & not correcting horrible form) to 15-20 crossfitters…that is unsafe in my book!

If you apply the above points to anything you will have a bunch of messed up bodies.

ROLLING PATTERNS FOR ROTATION

Rolling is a fundamental movement we all learned how to do during neurodevelopment, it is the second milestone in neurodevelopment after head control.  Rolling combines the use of the upper extremities, core, and lower extremities in a coordinated manner to move from one posture to another. This is done from prone (face down) to supine (face up) and supine to prone. 

Rolling is commonly utilised in neurological rehabilitation but is just as important and effective in any rehabilitation programme, particularly for those who have dysfunction in rotational movements or who play rotational dominant sports.  It can be used as an assessment and it is also the corrective. There are several cues to help improve someone's rolling pattern and also regressions available.

It is a great method to assess for and correct inefficient movements that involve rotation of the trunk and body; weight shifting in the lower body; and coordinated movements of the head, neck, and upper body.

Upper limb rolling begins with the eyes and head moving in the transverse/rotational plane with the body being taken along for the ride - "where the eyes go the body will follow".  Rolling can be done either leading with the upper limb or lower limb, depending on your assessment findings and needs.