glute function

CORE EXERCISE #3 : BIRD DOG

3rd core exercise in our top 4...

BIRD DOG:

Bird Dog Exercise Gold Coast Mobile Personal Trainer.jpg

Another great core activation drill. Awesome for improving Multifidus function; neck & shoulder stability as well as overall core stability.
For full explanation of the exercise please visit "stability exercises" in our exercise library.

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PRONATION IS NOT THE ENEMY

So many of my clients have issues with being able to pronate (flat arch) their feet, either one foot or both feet.  This is usually due to the misconception that pronation is BAD.  Pronation is NOT bad, as long as you are able to control the pronation and move from supination (high arch) to pronation and back to supination.  The problem comes when you are STUCK in either pronation or supination.  Then there is work to be done.  

Often the problem of being stuck in pronation results in being given orthotics to wear. The problem I have with this is that now instead of being STUCK in pronation, you will be STUCK in supination due to the orthotics, neither which are useful to you.  

The best way to deal with feet that are STUCK is to reconnect with them and put them through the ranges they were designed to achieve, slowly reminding the brain that it can access these ranges of movement.

The inability to pronate or supinate can have massive negative effects further up the kinetic chain. You definitely want to get assessed and make sure your feet are propelling you through life and not slowing you down!

NOW LET ME SEE YOUR HIPS SWING

NOW LET ME SEE YOUR HIPS SWING

Incorrect swinging (as seen in first half of clip) can cause lower back pain and injury. Swing with the hips and not the lower back. Neutral spine (including neck), grounded feet, powered hip hinge, functional breathing.

FLEXED LUMBAR SPINE OR NEUTRAL PELVIS?

Picture 1 = Anterior Pelvic Tilt    Picture 2 = Neutral Pelvis    I have my finger on my Anterior Superior Iliac Spine (ASIS/most antierior bony prominence at the front of your pelvic bone) & my thumb on my Posterior Superior Iliac Spine (PSIS/bony prominence at back of pelvis, usually where your dimple is), when these two points are level, you are in a neutral pelvic position.

Picture 1 = Anterior Pelvic Tilt

Picture 2 = Neutral Pelvis

I have my finger on my Anterior Superior Iliac Spine (ASIS/most antierior bony prominence at the front of your pelvic bone) & my thumb on my Posterior Superior Iliac Spine (PSIS/bony prominence at back of pelvis, usually where your dimple is), when these two points are level, you are in a neutral pelvic position.

I wanted to bring attention to the fact that there is a difference between causing a flexed position in the lumbar spine (lower back) and creating a neutral position at the pelvis. When your pelvis is in a neutral position, it doesn't necessarily mean that your lumbar spine is going to be in a flexed position.

I say this because I often find that people who have a history of lumbar disc bulges or herniations seem to perceive a neutral pelvic position as lumbar flexion.  They also tend to be afraid of moving their pelvis out of an anterior tilt as they use it as a protective mechanism to avoid lumbar flexion.  

The main issue I have with this is that although a flexed lumbar spine (particularly under load) causes disc compression, so does an excessive anterior pelvic tilt, not only does this alter the pressure at the discs but it also causes Sacroiliac Joint (SIJ) compression & encourages core instability.  The majority of people who have excessive anterior pelvic tilts also have dysfunctional glutes (glute activation decompresses the SIJ). One of the roles of your glutes is to create a posterior tilt of the pelvis.  If you never let your pelvis move out of anterior tilt then you are disabling your glutes (compare the above two pictures again and tell me which one can you see more glutes in) and you can probably add obliques; abdominals; TvA to that dysfunctional list too. You can tell by the creases of my top that in the first picture on the left my abs are stretched and elongated and in the picture on the right, they are contracted. Stretched abs = unprotected and compressed lower back!

Your body will find stability where it can if it is lacking and this can be in the form of SIJ compression due to dysfunction in your core musculature.   Make sure you aren't forcing yourself into anterior tilt, whether under load (lifting or pushing weight) or not but working on pelvic stability instead so you know where neutral is.

Don't feed a habit...CHANGE a habit!